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Primula 'Nikki Perry'

Nikkipetegarden

Nikki and Pete Perry

My name is Pete Perry. I entered the world of horticulture in 1961, and immediately became hooked on Primulas and woodland plants. I have written for many UK publications Gardeners Chronicle, Garden News, Hertfordshire Countryside, The Hardy Plant Society, The Garden History Society and the National Primula and Auricula Society. I also designed the front covers for Gardeners Chronicle in the mid-Sixties.
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I have also raised my own varieties, including a green primrose, which I have Named Nikki Perry', after my wife. (see pictures). Please join us in our appreciation of this most interesting and variable genus of plants, of which there are almost 500 species. The genus Primula is wide and varied, from the native British Primrose and it's cousins, The Cowslip, Oxlip, Scots Primrose and The Birds Eye Primrose, through candelabras, Asiatic, Auriculas to those oddites known as Anomalous, Double, Elizabethan and Victorian primroses. Please join us in our celebration of this wonderful section of plants, and some of the other interesting plants, including unusual forms of British Native wild plants such as white and pink dandelions, unusual forms of wood anemone and lesser celandines all of which we grow and propagate in our garden in Stevenage. Now Go To: Vernales primroses'Edit

... Now go to Vernales primulasEdit

The genus Primula is wide and varied, from the native British Primrose and it's cousins, The Cowslip, Oxlip, Scots Primrose and The Birds Eye Primrose, through candelabras, Asiatic, Auriculas to those oddites known as Anomalous, Elizabethan and Victorian primroses. Please join us in our celebration of this wonderful section of plants...Edit

Latest activityEdit

  • edit Pete's plants Wiki
    edited by A Fandom user diff
  • edit Pete's plants Wiki
    edited by A Fandom user diff
    Summary: Describe your topic:
  • edit Victorian & Elizabethan primulas
    edited by MOTF diff
    Summary: /* Victorian and Elizabethan primulas include the Victorian Gold-Laced Polyanthus, Double primroses and the quaintly odd plants that thumb|Jack-In-The-Green Primroseenthusiasts call Jack-in-The Green, Hose-In-Hose, Pantaloon, Gallygaskin and Jackanap
  • edit Vernales primulas
    edited by MOTF diff
    Edited the section: thumb|Red and Yellow CowslipsThe Vernales section of Primulas includes the European species: The native UK Woodland Primrose Primula Acaulis, the meadow Cowslip, Primula Veris, The Oxlip Primula Elatior, The Birds-Eye Primrose Primula Farinosa and The Scots Primrose Primula Scotica. The Oxlip is now quite rare in the UK, growing only in a few woods in East Anglia. The cowslip, still quite common in meadows, sometimes occurs with red flowers, rather than the common yellow, and this, crossed with the common thumb|Oxlips Primrose, or a related European species, Primula altaica, and possibly the Oxlip, gave rise to the plant we now know as The Polyanthus (meaning multi-headed). The common primrose, P.acaulis, grows in woodlands all across the UK except in Scotland, where it is replaced by the Scots Primrose, P.Scotica. It is normally pale yellow, though occasionally, you may find white ones and pale pink varieties. P.Scotica, as the name suggests, is found only in the highlands of Scotland, and is purple in colour. Similar to Primula Scotica is the Bird's Eye Primrose, P.Farinosa, which is confined to the North East of England, though it is becaming very scarce in the wild. The Birds-eye primrose is pale purple. The Cowslip, P.Veris, is still quite common in meadows across the UK, though it is becoming more scarce through intensive farming and building works. The Cowslip has deep yellow nodding flowers. The rarest of all though, is The Oxlip, P.Elatior, which now only exists in the UK in less than half-a-dozen woods in East Anglia. This is similar to the Cowslip, with with larger, paler yellow flowers. Another problem for the Oxlip is that where it grows, there are also primroses and cowslips nearby, and they all inter-breed, producing various hybrids, which is threatening the original species. It is thought this is how the first polyanthus occurred. Now go to Candelabra primulas
    Summary: /* thumb|Red and Yellow CowslipsThe Vernales section of Primulas includes the European species: The native UK Woodland Primrose Primula Acaulis, the meadow Cowslip, Primula Veris, The Oxlip Primula Elatior, The Birds-Eye Primrose Primula Farinosa and
    Added photo:
  • edit Vernales primulas
    edited by MOTF diff
    Edited the section: thumb|Red and Yellow CowslipsThe Vernales section of Primulas includes the European species: The native UK Woodland Primrose Primula Acaulis, the meadow Cowslip, Primula Veris, The Oxlip Primula Elatior, The Birds-Eye Primrose Primula Farinosa and The Scots Primrose Primula Scotica. The Oxlip is now quite rare in the UK, growing only in a few woods in East Anglia. The cowslip, still quite common in meadows, sometimes occurs with red flowers, rather than the common yellow, and this, crossed with the common Primrose, or a related European species, Primula altaica, and possibly the Oxlip, gave rise to the plant we now know as The Polyanthus (meaning multi-headed). The common primrose, P.acaulis, grows in woodlands all across the UK except in Scotland, where it is replaced by the Scots Primrose, P.Scotica. It is normally pale yellow, though occasionally, you may find white ones and pale pink varieties. P.Scotica, as the name suggests, is found only in the highlands of Scotland, and is purple in colour. Similar to Primula Scotica is the Bird's Eye Primrose, P.Farinosa, which is confined to the North East of England, though it is becaming very scarce in the wild. The Birds-eye primrose is pale purple. The Cowslip, P.Veris, is still quite common in meadows across the UK, though it is becoming more scarce through intensive farming and building works. The Cowslip has deep yellow nodding flowers. The rarest of all though, is The Oxlip, P.Elatior, which now only exists in the UK in less than half-a-dozen woods in East Anglia. This is similar to the Cowslip, with with larger, paler yellow flowers. Another problem for the Oxlip is that where it grows, there are also primroses and cowslips nearby, and they all inter-breed, producing various hybrids, which is threatening the original species. It is thought this is how the first polyanthus occurred. Now go to Candelabra primulas
    Summary: /* thumb|Red and Yellow CowslipsThe Vernales section of Primulas includes the European species: The native UK Woodland Primrose Primula Acaulis, the meadow Cowslip, Primula Veris, The Oxlip Primula Elatior, The Birds-Eye Primrose Primula Farinosa and
  • edit Pete's plants Wiki
    edited by MOTF diff
    Summary: /* thumb|Primula 'Nikki Perry'thumb|Nikki and Pete PerryMy name is Pete Perry. I entered the world of horticulture in 1961, and immediately became hooked on Primulas and woodland plants, and have written for UK publications Gardeners Chronicle, Garde
  • edit Pete's plants Wiki
    edited by MOTF diff
    Summary: /* thumb|Primula 'Nikki Perry'thumb|Pete My name is Pete Perry. I entered the world of horticulture in 1961, and immediately became hooked on Primulas and woodland plants, and have written for UK publications Gardeners Chronicle, Garden News, Hertfor
  • edit Pete's plants Wiki
    edited by MOTF diff
    Summary: /* thumb|Primula 'Nikki Perry'My name is Pete Perry. I entered the world of horticulture in 1961, and immediately became hooked on Primulas and woodland plants, and have written for UK publications Gardeners Chronicle, Garden News, Hertfordshire Coun
    Added photo:
  • edit Victorian & Elizabethan primulas
    edited by MOTF diff
    Summary: Jack-in-the-green primrose
    Added photos:
  • edit Victorian & Elizabethan primulas
    edited by MOTF diff
    Summary: Double primroses

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